Tuesday, March 31, 2015

New & upcoming historical novels in celebration of Women's History Month, part 2

Here's part two of my gallery of historical novels by women, about women - just finished under the wire, since March is almost over.  Part 1 can be found here.



Marci Jefferson's second novel (after Girl on the Golden Coin) is about Marie Mancini, one of the famous nieces of the ruthlessly powerful Cardinal Mazarin in the Sun King's court.  Thomas Dunne, May.



Mackin's newest historical title will introduce readers to a little-known woman who deserves recognition: Beatrix Ferrand, a pioneering landscape architect whose passion for gardens is fixed after a European tour.  Her "good family" includes her aunt, writer Edith Wharton.  NAL, June.



McLain's followup to the bestseller and book club hit The Paris Wife centers on Beryl Markham, noted aviator, adventurer, and memoirist (West with the Night) in colonial Kenya.  And yes, she was also known for her love affair with Denys Finch Hatton (among others).  Ballantine, August.




Turn-of-the-century Puerto Rico is the setting for this new novel about Afro-Cuban midwife Ana Belén Opaku and the male-centered society that women were forced to endure in this time and place.  Booktrope, February.



It's not easy being the daughter of Catherine de Médicis, Queen of France. Perinot moves to a new publisher and to hardcover format with her second novel, a tale of Princess Margot, who's caught between family loyalty and a forbidden love at a time of religious turmoil.  Thomas Dunne, December.



From the bestselling author of Wench comes a new novel, set in the post-Civil War era, about two women and one man who move to Chicago in search of new possibilities now that slavery has been abolished.  Amistad, May.



Eliza Redgold (pseudonym of writer and academic Dr. Elizabeth Reid Boyd) takes us back to 11th-century Coventry, England, when Lady Godiva takes a drastic step to protest unfair taxation against Mercia's people.  St. Martin's Griffin, July.



Robuck's latest literary-focused novel examines the marriage of artist Sophia Peabody and writer Nathaniel Hawthorne, and the many challenges they faced before and after their enduring marriage. NAL, May.



I loved Thornton's previous novel The Tiger Queens so am eagerly anticipating her end-of-year release, which looks at the women surrounding Alexander the Great.  NAL, December.



When I read and reviews Williams' The Secret Life of Violet Grant (which was a lot of fun), I hadn't realized it was first in what will be a trilogy about the Schuyler sisters. The heroine of this one is Christina "Tiny" Hardcastle, Vivian's sister, whose picture-perfect society life begins to unravel during the summer of 1966.  Putnam, June.

16 comments:

  1. Thank you for the list. They all sound interesting. A lot of these authors you have named seem new.

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    1. There are (I think) two debut novels in the bunch, but some of the others are authors I haven't covered here before - but hope to in the near future!

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  2. Thank you so much for this! I liked Williams's Violet Grant and I'm adding this to my wishlist. As well as Thornton's upcoming one. She's an excellent writer!

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    1. I agree on both. I like how Thornton chooses historical figures who have fascinating stories but don't have a ton of novels written about them (or their era) already.

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  3. Hi, Sarah. I've had my eye on Marci Jefferson's Girl on the Golden Coin for a while, but her second novel looks just as interesting. However, all the other titles you've mentioned are also interesting. I love the different backgrounds of the women written about. Thanks for another great list.

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    1. Hi Yvonne, thanks for your comments. I tried to find novels with a variety of time frames and settings to list. I got a copy of Enchantress of Paris at a conference earlier this year (signed by the author) and am looking forward to reading/reviewing it in the near future.

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  4. Here I am saying something very strange: after a lot of time, despite Hawthorne's achievements as a founder of USian / American literature -- he was not worthy of the women by whom he was surrounded, and who kept him afloat.

    :)

    Love, C.

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    1. I'm embarrassed to say that, despite having lived for nearly three decades in New England, I knew very little about his personal life - other than his infamous ancestor from the Salem witch trials. His wife was never mentioned when we studied his works in school.

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  5. Paula McLain is also an author who is very kind to other writers.

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  6. These each look good, Sarah. Glad too, to see Erika's newest novel included! She's found/made a nice historical niche for herself.

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    1. Hers is one that particularly interests me, because I know so little about Sophia Hawthorne (see above). And it's interesting to see Erika Robuck moving back into the 19th century with her newest book. I approve :) The first research paper I ever wrote in high school was on Hawthorne's "Young Goodman Brown."

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  7. Anonymous2:47 PM

    The 3rd in Beatriz Williams's trilogy is being published in Nov. so we don't have to wait too much longer after the 2nd. It's ALONG THE INFINITE SEA.

    As for Queen Margot, there is a dual biography of Margot and her mother Catherine de Medici coming out in June - RIVAL QUEENS by Nancy Goldstone. I'm attempting to get through the Edelweiss version.

    So much good stuff!!

    Sarah Other Librarian

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    1. How does she write so fast? I saw the cover reveal for INFINITE SEA on her FB page the other day, and it's *gorgeous*. She also writes as Juliana Gray.

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  8. Excellent list, all are joining my TBR. I have only read one book on Beryl Markum before and it was a YA book, so I'm excited to see where this book goes.

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    1. Was that YA book by Michaela MacColl? She always picks intriguing characters (I have a copy of her newest, about Louisa May Alcott).

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